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Thinkpad 8: Running on an apple A4 processor ? #ironictypo

This short blog post is just to poke some fun at the silly typos that happen in mass scale online selling.

I have been anxiously awaiting the arrival of my newly purchased Lenovo Thinkpad 8 tablet PC!  Lenovo even has communicated that it is designed to take some market share away from Apple.

While google-ing for a case and accessories, I found Amazon's Thinkpad 8 product page.  I scrolled down and casually looked at the documentation, only to find that their description has a bit of an error!



Here is what I found:

ooops!  #copypastefail

Clearly this is wrong, but is fun to find little typos like this.  As of the writing of this post, the Amazon page still had the error on it here:  http://www.amazon.com/Lenovo-ThinkPad-Processor-storage-capacity/dp/B00I9ZR5Y2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1394139089&sr=8-1&keywords=thinkpad+8

Have you found silly or ironic other typos online? Share them with me and the world via twitter at @aschwabe

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